Waste not, want not… in China

FROM CHINA DAILY While you often hear Chinese parents tell their kids to notwaste food, the fact is food waste accounts for about 70percent of the country's mounting garbage production.That's compared to less than 20 percent in manydeveloped countries, where sorting and processing havebeen the norm since the 1980s. And as China's waste processing capabilities simply can't keep pace with theamount of garbage that is being produced, food waste is abigger problem than it might be. "As people's livesimprove, the catering industry is booming and dietaryhabits are changing, so we're producing massive amounts of food waste," Beijing Technology and BusinessUniversity's Department of Environmental Science and Engineering professor Ren Lianhai says. "China has a long way to go in terms of better disposal because it lacks a national policy, scientific management and processing methods." Beijing was among a slew of local governments to pass regulations in 2011 about trash sorting and food waste disposal, largely because of public concerns about "gutter oil" - cooking oil retrievedfrom drains and sometimes reused by restaurants. The problem is that governments, NGOs and enterprises are struggling to cook up solutions for kitchen waste disposal and are finding they don't work or are difficult to implement. Recipes that are being tried include composting the waste into organic fertilizer using enzymes and earthworms, burning it to create electricity, feeding it to pigs and even using gutter oil as biofuel topower Dutch Airlines' planes. "Kitchen waste has become a primary pollution source and imposes serious risks to people's health and the environment," Ren says. Ren, who has studied waste management for more than a decade, explains the dangers of burying kitchen waste in landfills. China's food waste is 74 percent water - that's three times the saturation of US and European kitchen waste. It's referred to as "wet waste" globally. The pressure of being buried, combined with the chemical reactions of microbial biodegradation, causes the water to ferment and percolate, forcing hazardous and even carcinogenic sludge toooze out, Ren explains. And food waste poses sanitation hazards before it even reaches the landfills, he adds. Take Beijing, for example. The capital's households produce 11,000 tons of kitchen waste, plus the 2,500 tons that spew out of restaurants, a day. But the municipality's three large-scale processing plants can only handle 800 tons a day of food waste. The most common methods of kitchen waste disposal are feeding it to pigs and composting. While the evidence is inconclusive, many experts worry that turning household kitchen waste intopig slop is dangerous.…